Back pain

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Topic Title: Back pain
Created On: 08/31/2000 04:25 PM

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 06/16/2003 03:13 AM

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louisryoshin

Posts: 80

See my site http://www.backfixbodywork.com And read the intro articles and testimonials and the info on the back book page. Your damage to the disks probably was caused by the force of the accident making your feet push too hard into the floor and the lumbar curve got accenmtuated - plus you most likely had short hamstring muscles and adductor muscles and front pelvic muscles as well. It's the soft connective tissue that needs relengthening in massive amounts. Then the vertebrae go back to their proper position and curvature. You can then eith get some surgery for the disks or some nutritional emphasis can help with large amounts of green juices (be careful with blood thinning medicine combo here) and sea weeds. They rebuild tisse. Also a potent brand of cartilage and ligament vit-min-herb supplement and lots of water. These are nutritional helps so the body can use the materials to rebuild the tissue if it is possible. But the correctuion of the shortness can help a lot to begin with. Try looking at fixing accumulated shortness and read all the way thru to last section. Email me OK after some reading.
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 11/08/2002 04:09 PM

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kas517

Posts: 53

Just checking in...I am about 5 weeks into pilates at this point and have become a devoted follower...my core is getting stronger, which is in turn easing any remaining back pain...I would recommend this to anyone!
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 10/21/2002 10:01 AM

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22219199

Posts: 55

I agree with Kas_517. I took my first pilates class the other night after joining my tennis club. I have less back pain and my endurance seems to have gone up a notch (not sure if this is just mental though). Thanks, John
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 10/10/2002 01:41 PM

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kas517

Posts: 53

Went to my first pilates class last night and loved it! Though it's obviously a bit soon to claim great results, the exercises were strenuous enough to know that I was getting a great workout, yet very relaxing and therapeutic for my back. Great recommendation - I will be checking in as I progress...
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 09/27/2002 02:56 AM

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missliz

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I'm not strong enough yet to go to full out Pilates, my PT flicks the whip pretty hard and wears me out, and I've had a total rebuild on my knees and feet that are still healing BUT we've worked in some of the basic Pilates stuff. The mat work is pretty much what you want. The machine stuff is pretty advanced and and not supposed to be any better just pricier. My SI joints went to hell when my legs realigned and we added crunches, among other things. I'm up to 150 a day and my back is really calming down now that the abs are carrying the load they're supposed to. The pelvic floor muscles will really do amazing things if you strengthen them too, but it's tough. There aren't any specific exercises for them. Pilates will pick this up, but bench press will work those puppies hard too. Bend your knees and put your feet on the bench so the back stays flat and don't be a wimp on the amount of wheight. Use dumbells if you don't have a spotter. (Dumbbells will also equalize your arm strength and help your running technique) All sorts of abdominal muscles you never knew you had will kick in to stabilize your whole body as you set. Add some upper back work and your running form will really improve dramaticly. If you don't know how to do this stuff, get a decent trainer or PT to teach you- bad form will make it all worse. I don't know what herniated disk implies so you should ask your doc, too. Weak abdominal and internal muscles will overload the postural muscles in the back on anybody and cause pain in people with no discernable injury. In a lot of people herniated disks don't cause any pain at all. Muscle imbalance stuff can just make life hell. Go to the Pilates. It really is the ultimate ab class. My Physical Therapist swears by it. Miss Liz Once and future competitive athlete and free wheight junkie
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 09/26/2002 04:38 PM

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kas517

Posts: 53

With chronic back problems, I have been looking for a strenuous, yet low-impact workout for a while now. I just recently signed up for a Pilates class and will be starting next week. I had surgery for a herniated disk nearly 5 years ago and am once again able to run, but can feel the impact in my back...am quite anxious to see if the Pilates help. I will be checking in with my progress from time to time and would like to hear how and if Pilates have helped others w/ their back pain. Thanks!
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 09/02/2002 11:43 PM

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missliz

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Yoga is fabulous for almost everything BUT- there are different kinds, and depending on the type of back trouble and the teacher, it could be less than great. All the physical therapists where I go swear by Pilates mat work, which is all about trunk strengthing and stabilization. It's actually quite similar to yoga, but was designed for dancers and athletes. Find a freindly class- you don't want a workout Nazi running it.I plan on trying this when I get released from PT. Another thing that helps is to get your feet and knees looked at. My back trouble is at least partly driven by foot and knee trouble, and a good set of orthotics has made a huge difference. you want to go to a real orthoticist, not a physical therapist who does prefab stuff on the side.
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 03/16/2002 06:48 AM

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louisryoshin

Posts: 80

Back problems that just keep developing (vs some blow to the body) usually come from accumulated shortness in the soft connectivve tissues of the muscles in legs, pelvis and absomen, throwing the body into a very tense zig zag that gets hard in its soft tissue shape. IF your diet has lots of fruits & vegetables, and you do intensive yoga, such as Bikrams, you may be able to pull the re-lengthening to remove the years of accumulated bunch-up. A faster way is to get a series of Structural Integration Bodywork sessions, and combine the yoga with that, but be sure you emphasize lengthening the legs, pelvis and abs, including the adductors. Don't just try to lengthen the back. It could make the back pain worse and it may not even give way because the leg shortness is holding the back muscles too tight. I can send you free info on e-mail. I used to do this for Olympic athletes & people referred to me by doctors.
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 08/31/2000 04:25 PM

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Jeffrey3181

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I suffer from chronic back pain. I have been to physical therapy and that has helped me enormously. I am thinking of enrolling in yoga classes to increase my flexibility and strength. Does anyone have any experience with this? Is yoga good for back pain?
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